Issue Reviews 2002 The Problemist, November 2002
 

 

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The Problemist, November 2002
Written by Michael McDowell   

The November Problemist featured a selection of problems by the winners of the various sections in the 1st World Composing Championship for Individuals. The study section was won by David Gurgenidze of Georgia.

David Gurgenidze

2nd Prize, Karlin-55 JT, 2000

8/8/8/4P3/3Pp3/kP2S2p/PbK5/8

white to play and win

1.Kb1, threatening 2.Sc2 mate, and forcing 1…Kb4. There follows 2.Kxb2 h2 3.e6 h1Q 4.e7 Qh5 5.e8Q Qxe8 6.Sd5+ Ka5 (If 6…Kb5 7.Sc7+) 7.b4+ Ka4 8.a3 e3 9.Sc3 mate, an echo of the mate threatened at move 2.

Articles included a lengthy review by Chris Feather of helpmates in 2 where pinned black pieces capture the pinning piece, Michael Lipton on two-move miniatures featuring focal reciprocal correction, and a lecture report by John Rice on the Chess Player's Chronicle tourney of 1852-54 entitled ‘Was this the first ever composing tourney?’

Michael Lipton

Sp. HM., diagrammes, 1997

8/1B6/2S5/1K6/4r3/3k4/5Q2/2R5

Mate in 2

Michael Lipton's problem opens with a pure waiting key 1.Ba8, giving the variations 1…R random on rank 2.Se5; 1…Rb4+ 2.Sxb4; 1…R random on file 2.Sb4; 1…Re5+ 2.Sxe5; 1…Re3 2.Qc2; 1…Re2 2.Qd4.

A problem from the set of 8 problems which won first prize for Walter Grimshaw in the Chess Player's Chronicle tourney. A spectacular three-mover which continues to be used in solving tourneys to this day!

Walter Grimshaw

1st Prize set, Chess Player's Chronicle, 1852-1854

Mate in 3

1.Rf1! with two threats 2.Sf3 and 2.f3+. The main line is 1…exf1Q 2.Sf3 Kxf3 3.Rd2. 1…f3 leads to the switchback 2.Rg1 with 3.Rg4 to follow.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 November 2011 13:41
 
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