Issue Reviews 2013 The Problemist, November 2013
 

 

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The Problemist, November 2013
Written by Michael McDowell   

The November issue featured reports by the participants on the WCCC at Batumi. Ian Watson provided background details, Michael McDowell discussed the solving events and Paul Valois reported on the official business. Articles included Valery Liskovets on Completely Unavoidable Mate, and the second part of Michael McDowell’s review of C. S. Kipping’s column in Chess. John Rice showed some problems from 1913, and David Shire marked the 80th birthday of ex-BCPS President Don Smedley. Les Blackstock presented his award for the 2010 helpmate moremovers, and Browsing in the Library featured a 1975 collection of the work of Danish composer Walther Jørgensen. In the Supplement David Shire showed reciprocal Sushkovs using a white rook, Bernd Gräfrath discussed the composition of a record proof game, while Geoff Foster showed some three-move mutates by Australian composer Bill Whyatt, a classic reflexmate by G. F. Anderson, and examples of the striptease theme.

William A. Whyatt

Sunday Telegraph, 1961

b2r4/8/5bS1/1QPk1Bp1/3P4/KPP5/8/8

Mate in 2

1.Ka2 ()

1...Bb7 2.Qxa7
1...Bc6 2.Qc4
1...Rd6 2.c6
1...R else 2.Qd7
1...Bxd4 2.c4
1...fB else 2.Se7
1...g4 2.Sf4

Mates are set for all black moves, and White simply needs a waiting key. The point of the problem lies in the three tries 1.Ka4? Bc6!, 1.Kb4? Rb8!, and 1.Kb2? Bxd4!, all of which fail by allowing pinning defences which prevent the set mates. A perfectly constructed problem.

 

Don Smedley

2nd Prize, The Problemist, 1977/II

bqs5/4RpPK/r1Q2S2/p4k1p/r1s4R/p3pS2/2Pp2P1/bB6

Mate in 2

1.Sxh5 (>2.g4)

1...Sb2 2.Rxf7 (2.c4? Sd3!)
1...S4b6 2.c4 (2.Qd7? Sxd7!)
1...S4d6 2.Qd7 (2.Sg3? Kf6!)
1...Se5 2.Sg3 (2.Rxf7? Sxf7!)

Cyclic dual avoidance. David Shire considers this to be one of the finest British two-movers.

 

Walther Jørgensen

Skakbladet, 1968

Q7/2K3P1/S2P1p2/1p6/kP1p1r1p/p7/P3Pp1b/5b2

Mate in 3

1.Qd8 (>2.Kb8 > 3.Qa5)

1...Re4 2.Kc6
1...Rf3 2.Kb7
1...Rg4 2.Kc8
1...Rf5 2.Kd7

A very clear example of rook cross met by king cross.

 
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